Norway

 

Population 2019: 8.82 million
GDP 2019: 399 billion EUR
GDP per capita 2019: 44,545 EUR
Taxation for Lotteries: 16% in taxes and fees
Charity lotteries allowed: Yes

 

LEGISLATION

Norway has a monopoly model that supports the state lottery. In Norway, the Lotteri-og Stiftelsestilsynet (Norwegian Gaming Authority, NGA) is in charge of supervising and controlling all private and state-operated games of chance, including lotteries. In Norway, two state-operated companies fall under this category and also have a monopoly; The Norsk Rikstoto (horse racing) and Norsk Tipping (the state lottery which also offers lotto, sports betting and various instant casino games, both landbased and online).

Norway has a monopoly model that supports the state lottery. In Norway, the Lotteri-og Stiftelsestilsynet (Norwegian Gaming Authority, NGA) is in charge of supervising and controlling all private and state-operated games of chance, including lotteries. In Norway, two state-operated companies fall under this category and also have a monopoly; The Norsk Rikstoto (horse racing) and Norsk Tipping (the state lottery which also offers lotto, sports betting and various instant casino games, both landbased and online).

Concerning legislation, there are three laws that, in conjunction with the NGA, regulate games of chance in Norway: the Gaming Scheme Act, the Lottery Act, and the Totalizator Act. Together, these laws have three primary objectives:

  1. To ensure that gaming schemes are arranged satisfactorily under public control;
  2. To prevent negative consequences of gaming (addiction);
  3. To ensure it is possible to allocate the profits from games of chance to approved good causes.

As such, lotteries are an important source of income for humanitarian, cultural, sports, and other socially beneficial organisations. Especially for charity lotteries, which ideally allocate around 40 per cent of their turnover to charities.

In 2015, the lottery market was re-regulated, providing a few organisations with the opportunity to organise charity lotteries within strict limits. This re-regulation originated after a legal dispute primarily based on art. 36 of the EEA Agreement, regulating freedom of services in the European Economic Area. After all, a single-operator licensing system and the non-transparent renewal disproportionately affect the European free movement of services negatively. Also, the restriction on the free movement of services must be proportionate to the objectives of a country’s national gambling policy and must not distinguish between nationalities.

Strict conditions accompanied this re-regulation. The most important being:

  1. All profits of any lotteries had to go to charities and their charitable work outside of Norway;
  2. Only charities can apply for a license, which is valid for nine years;
  3. There is a maximum of five licenses;
  4. The annual turnover of these new lotteries limited at 300 million NOK (±30 million EUR) per licence.

Since then, apart from the Norsk Tipping and Norsk Rikstoto, there are four other (combinations of) charities that have obtained a licence.

Sources Austrian